Week 16 (Dec. 10 – 14) Make-up Work

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Monday 12/10

Today students engaged in peer review to help each other improve their CPS essays.

Learning Objective: Giving, accepting, and responding to feedback are crucial responsibilities in a writing community; meaningful feedback leads meaningful revision.

 

Come to ACCESS on Tuesday or Thursday with a hard copy of your essay, and meet a partner for a peer review session.  Follow the directions below:

1)       On your essay, use your colored pencil to HIGHLIGHT and LABEL your claim, counterclaim, and rebuttal.

  • Write any specific feedback requests you have for your group at the top of your essay.

 

2)       Each person reads their feedback requests and essay out loud to the group.

 

3)       When you are done reading, pass your paper one person to the right.

As you read, offer the following feedback:

  • Notice places where the writing is CLEAR and EFFECTIVE: put a smiley face  with comment about what exactly makes the writing effective.
    • Ø “Pathos appeal gets reader emotionally involved.”
    • Ø “Rebuttal accomplished through extensive support—facts, statistics, etc.”
  • Consider your INTEREST as a reader:  identify with an X the places in the paper where you lose interest and try to explain why:
    • Ø “X   You never acknowledge the counterclaim that…”
    • Ø “X   Try to develop Pathos with a story about a specific person who experienced…”
  • CONVENTIONS: indicate possible mistakes but do not correct
    • Ø Circle spelling/punctuation errors
    • Ø [Bracket sentences] that don’t make sense, fragments, run-ons
  • At the end, write one POSTIVE comment:
    • Ø What do you like best about your peer’s synthesis? (Why? How might he or she do more of it?)
  • Then write one IMPROVEMENT comment about anything you want to point out to the writer that might help them make this essay better before turning it in.

4)       HOT SEAT: pass one writer’s essay around and each person gives verbal feedback

  • What stands out to your when you think about this essay?
  • What is great and what could be improved?

Repeat with one at a time with each person’s essay.

Work Collected: Credit given for peer review session

Homework: Make as many revisions as possible and save to Google Docs for Tuesday.

 

Tuesday 12/11

Today students finished the peer review session from Monday and then began the revision process using peer feedback, their ASN chart, and the rubric to make qualitative improvements to their Civic Position Statement essays.

Learning Objective: Use revision to flex the approach of an argument, appealing to the audience’s knowledge level, concerns, values, and possible biases.

1)       Review the goals and purposes of REVISION:

  • Revision involves qualitative improvements that develop and refine the essay according to purpose and the audience. This…
    • Ø May involve a complete rewrite.
    • Ø May involve new paragraphs, rearranging paragraphs, dividing and rewriting paragraphs.
    • Ø May include adding more detail to make writing more vivid and engaging.
    • Ø May involve new researched information to support your argument.
    • Ø May include combining and rewriting sentences.
  • When you REVISE your essay, you EXPAND your essay:

Entertain a new perspective related to your purpose

EXplain details in more depth

Provide additional information and examples for claims you make

Add a story, an example, or more facts

Notice a counterclaim someone might raise to your claim and rebut

Develop your voice or add another voice to support your own: quotes, paraphrases, summaries from outside sources (research)

2)       Students spend the period revising their CPSs.

3)       Be sure to save to Google Docs.

4)       Remember the publishing expectations:

  • MLA format
  • TurnItIn.com
  • Additional options

Work Collected: none

Homework:

1)       Correctly formatted, error-free hard copy of final draft due in class Friday.

2)       Submit your final draft to turnitin.com

3)       Be sure you have your CPS rubric and Genre Study Process Rubric with you to hand in Friday.

 

Blockday 12/12-13

Today students spent the period revising and editing their Civic Position Statements.                  

Learning Objective: Use revision to flex the approach of an argument, appealing to the audience’s knowledge level, concerns, values, and possible biases.

1)       Use the feedback you received through peer review, your ASN chart, and your rubric to guide the revision process in making qualitative improvements to your essay.

2)       Have your polished, MLA formatted, error-free Civic Position Statement essay in your hand when you come to class on Friday.

Work Collected: none

Homework:

1)       Correctly formatted, error-free hard copy of final draft due in class Friday.

2)       Submit your final draft to turnitin.com

3)       Be sure you have your CPS rubric and Genre Study Process Rubric with you to hand in Friday.

 

Friday 12/14

Today student annotated their final drafts of their essays to show their understanding of the genre, and after they turned in the essays in, they completed their Genre Study Process Rubrics to assess their engagement in the genre study.

1)       Get out your hard copy final draft, your CPS rubric, and your Genre Study Process Rubric. Read your essay out loud to someone looking for typos and sentence problems.  If you find one:

  • With a pencil, draw ONE LINE through the word, phrase, or sentence.
  • Neatly re-write the word, phrase, or sentence above the mistake.
  • Add missing punctuation or neatly cross out (X) incorrect punctuation.

1)       Using a colored pencil, students complete the following on their hard copy final drafts:

  1. At the top, identify your TARGET AUDIENCE.
  2. Underline and label your CLAIM(S).
  3. Underline and label your COUNTERCLAIM(S).
  4. Bracket and label your REBUTTAL.
  5. Bracket and label any APPEALS: Logos, Ethos, Pathos
  6. Underline and label your QUALIFIER
  7. Underline and label your WARRANT.

2)       Using a different colored pencil from last genre study, complete your Genre Study Process Rubric:

  • Circle one bullet in every row.
  • Average the bullet-based scores for each section.
  • Turn this rubric into the IN-Box.

3)       Turn in your hard copy with rubric stapled on top.  Write your name/period on your rubric.

Work Collected:

1)       Correctly formatted, error-free hard copy of CPS final draft with rubric

2)       Completed Genre Study Process Rubric

Homework:

1)       Submit your final draft to turnitin.com

 

Wee 15 (Dec. 3 – 7) Make-up Work

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Monday 12/3       ASN chart

Today students considered the do’s and don’ts of a Civic Position Statement to create an Always/Sometimes/Never Chart for the genre.

Learning Objective: Genres are inherently complex, offering notable characteristics and qualities that writers employ to accomplish their purposes.

1)       On computer paper, copy down a full size Always Sometimes Never (ASN) chart:

Always / Sometimes /Never

2)        Find the “Parts of an Argument Handout” on the class web site, or see your teacher in ACCESS and find it in the class binder.

3)       Look over the noticings you have done for the Civic Position Statements you have read over the past week.

  • Use your noticings to complete each column of your ASN chart.
  • You should have multiple ideas to add to your chart for each term on the “Parts of an Argument Handout, ” including:
    • Ø Parts (claim, counterclaim, rebuttal, support, qualifier, warrant)
    • Ø Appeals (Logos, Ethos, Pathos)
    • Ø Openings & Closings

4)       Show your completed ASN chart to your teacher.

Work Collected: completed ASN charts

Homework: Come to class Tuesday with a claim based on a civic issued identified for a specific community (write in WNB)

                Civic Issue + what should be done by the community about the issue = claim

 

Tuesday 12/4

Today students got feedback from peers about their Civic Position claims, and then they began planning their essay.

Learning Objective: Use brainstorming/planning strategies to identify an issue of significance for both writer and identified community; develop a stance about an issue.

 

Topic Collaboration

1)       On a piece of computer paper, copy the following chart for topic collaboration:

 

 

          

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2)       Fill in the circle section.  For example:

  • Issue: Illegal Immigration
  • Community of concern: the USA
  • Claim:
    • Illegal immigrants are a plague on the nation and should be rounded up and deported.
    • Undocumented workers should be granted amnesty and allowed to become citizens.

3)       Show the chart to your parents, friends, other teachers, etc, and ask them to fill out the four corner boxes with their own ideas and suggestions about your topic.

  • Show this completed chart to your teacher.

4)       Look over the feedback you received:

  • Consider the feedback:
  1.                                                   I.      If it gives you ideas about directions to go with your essay, make notes in your WNB.
  2.                                                 II.      If you already know which direction you want to go, you may get some ideas about what your audience is interested in, or you may disregard the feedback completely.

 

5)       Copy the basic Civic Position Statement structure into your WNB:

  1.                                                   I.      Claim
  2.                                                 II.      Counterclaim #1
  3.                                              III.      Rebuttal w/ support
  • Logos?
  • Ethos?
  • Pathos?
  1.                                               IV.      Counterclaim #2
  2.                                                 V.      Rebuttal w/support
  3.                                               VI.      Additional counterclaims?
  4.                                            VII.      Claim

6)       Students use feedback on your chart and your own ideas to outline your Civic Position Statement.

Work Collected: Claim templates

Homework: Engage in extensive Google searching to find Support (Logos, Ethos, Pathos) for your claim.

 

 

Blockday 12/5-6

Learning Objective: Arguing an issue requires more than holding and defending a personal opinion; to plan and draft artful arguments, writers warrant claims, acknowledge opposing viewpoints, and assemble enough viable evidence to woo and win the audience.

Supplies: blank legal-sized computer paper, colored pencils

Walk IN:

1)       Follow the link below to visit the CSU web site:

  • Planning an Argument
  • Click on the links along the right-hand side, consider the questions, and write responses in WNB.

2)       Download the “Argument Planning template” from the class web site, or get one from your teacher:

  • See your teacher in ACCESS with questions about the template.
  • Use the template as a guide and tailor it to your individual needs, modifying it as you see fit to make your own on the blank legal-sized computer paper, using colored pencils.

3)       You must have a detailed, completed template before you begin writing your essay.

Work Collected: none

Homework: Finish typing your CPS for Friday.

 

 

Friday   12/7

Today students considered the characteristics of Openings and Closings in Civic Position Statements, and then wrote and revised their Introductions and Conclusions.

Learning Objective: The organization of an argument promotes its quality ans invites—or hampers—audience attention.

1)       Revisit a few of the Civic Position Statements you read last week.

  • Re-read the openings: what do they do that is effective?  What could you imitate in your own CPS?
  • Re-read the closings: what do they do that is effective?  What could you imitate in your own CPS?

2)       Write and revise your Introduction and Conclusion.

3)       You must have a completed, printed draft of your essay in your hands when you come to class on Monday.

Work Collected: none

Homework: Have printed copy of CPS in hand on Monday.

 

Week 14 (Nov. 26-30) Make-up Work

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Monday 11/26

Today students revisited the essays we read before break to learn 3 more important qualities of good arguments: Ethos, Pathos, and Logos.  Then we were introduced to a new issue that we will use to learn about how to write civic positions statements.

Learning Objective: Arguing about an issue requires more than holding and defending a personal opinion; to plan and draft artful arguments, writers warrant claims, acknowledge opposing viewpoints, and assemble enough viable evidence to woo and win the audience.1

1)         On the school web site, click on the handouts tab, and then find the Civic Position Statements.

  • Open up the essay “A Woman Among Warlords” and scan over it to remind yourself what it is about.
  • Find the document “Argument Terms with examples…” and open it.

(Both of these documents can be found in the Junior Class Note Book)

2)       Find the section of the “Argument Terms” document with the heading “Types of Proof.”

  • Listed are three different ways writers support their arguments.
  • Read over the first one carefully (Logos), and make notes in your WNB about what it is exactly.
  • Now find examples of this type of support in the essay ““A Woman Among Warlords.”
  • Make notes about what you notice about the authors use of Logos in your WNB.
  • Repeat with Pathos and Ethos.

3)       Access the web site “National Constitution Center,” and then scroll down until you find the video under the heading “Should the United States reduce immigration?”.

Work Collected: none

Homework:

  • Choose one potential topic for your CPS and freewrite for 20 minutes.

IF YOU DID NOT DO THE ACTIVITIES BELOW OVER BREAK:

  • Go to the class web site and click on the handouts tab. 
  • Look under the Civic Position Statements heading, and read an essay posted there.
  • For each essay, make notes in your WNB about what you NOTICE about the argument.
  • Use the Argument Terms handout posted there to guide you in your noticings.

 

Tuesday 11/27

Today students performed a Civic Position Statement noticing session with an essay about immigration in the U.S.

Learning Objective: Arguing about an issue requires more than holding and defending a personal opinion; to plan and draft artful arguments, writers warrant claims, acknowledge opposing viewpoints, and assemble enough viable evidence to woo and win the audience.

Supplies: video clip “30 Days…” buffered and time indexed; class sets of “Guard the Borders…” essay; class set of Argument Terms handout

Walk IN:

1)       Watch a video as an Introduction to Immigration Debate:

  • Link: Morgan Spurlock 30 Days Episode on Immigration
  • In WNB, write notes about what you notice about the different ways people try to argue their positions on the subject.
  • Open up the essay “Guard the Borders–and Face Facts, Too” by George Will Find the document “Argument Terms with examples…” and open it.

4)         On the school web site, click on the handouts tab, and then find the Civic Position Statements.

(Both of these documents can be found in the Junior Class Note Book)

2)        Read the essay carefully looking for the Claim and the Counterclaim.

3)       Students use Argument Terms handout to perform Noticings Session on “Guard the Borders…”

  • Make notes in your WNBs

4)       When finished with Argument terms, respond to the following questions in your WNB:

  • What value(s) is/are being promoted?
  • What “community” did this author assume his readers were a part of?
  • How are the values and community connected?
  • Does the writer adequately reflect the consequences to the audience, the “civic” aspect of the issue?
  • Does the writer propose some kind of action?

 

Work Collected:none

Homework:

  • Choose ANOTHER, DIFFERENT potential topic for your CPS and freewrite for 20 minutes.

IF YOU DID NOT DO THE ACTIVITIES BELOW OVER BREAK:

  • Go to the class web site and click on the handouts tab. 
  • Look under the Civic Position Statements heading, and read an essay posted there.
  • For each essay, make notes in your WNB about what you NOTICE about the argument.
  • Use the Argument Terms handout posted there to guide you in your noticings.

 

Blockday 11/28-29

Today Students finished their noticing session on the essay from Tuesday and then went on to do another noticing session on a new essay.  After students were don with both essays, students chose a position on the civic issue of immigration and wrote a mini-civic position statement.

Learning Objective: Arguing about an issue requires more than holding and defending a personal opinion; to plan and draft artful arguments, writers warrant claims, acknowledge opposing viewpoints, and assemble enough viable evidence to woo and win the audience.

1)       Finish noticing session from “Guard the Borders…” using Tuesday plan above.

2)       When finished,  read the article “Undocumented, Indispensable” by Anna Quindlen

5)       On the school web site, click on the handouts tab, and then find the Civic Position Statements.

  • Open up the essay “”Undocumented, Indispensable”
  • Find the document “Argument Terms with examples…” and open it.

(Both of these documents can be found in the Junior Class Note Book)

3)       Read the essay carefully looking for the Claim and the Counterclaim.

4)       Students use Argument Terms handout to perform Noticings Session on “Undocumented, Indispensable”

  • Students make notes in WNBs

5)       When finished with Argument terms, respond to the following questions in your WNB:

  • What value(s) is/are being promoted?
  • What “community” did this author assume his readers were a part of?
  • How are the values and community connected?
  • Does the writer adequately reflect the consequences to the audience, the “civic” aspect of the issue?
  • Does the writer propose some kind of action?

6)       Mini Civic Position Statement:

  • Based on these two articles, take a position on the Civic Issue of Immigration. On a fresh sheet of paper: (Complete sentences of course)
    • Write a Claim: I believe…because…
    • Support your claim with 2-3 key pieces of evidence from one article or the other.  Be sure to state where the evidence comes from.
    • Acknowledge the Counterclaim from the other article: People who disagree with me say that…
    • Rebut that Counterclaim with reasoning from your support article or your own ideas.
    • Reassert your Claim in a concluding sentence.

Work Collected: Mini-CPS on Immigration

Homework:

  • If you have not done any free-writing on a potential topic, do so for about 20 minutes.
  • Go to the class web site and click on the handouts tab. 
  • Look under the Civic Position Statements heading, and read NEW essay posted there.
  • For each essay, make notes in your WNB about what you NOTICE about the argument.
  • Use the Argument Terms handout posted there to guide you in your noticings.

 


Friday   11/30

Today students performed noticing sessions with at least 2 mentor texts of choice.

Learning Objective: Arguing about an issue requires more than holding and defending a personal opinion; to plan and draft artful arguments, writers warrant claims, acknowledge opposing viewpoints, and assemble enough viable evidence to woo and win the audience.

1)       On the school web site, click on the handouts tab, and then find the Civic Position Statements.

2)       Look under the Civic Position Statements heading, and read TWO NEW essays posted there.

3)       For each essay, make notes in your WNB about what you NOTICE about the argument.

4)       Use the Argument Terms handout posted there to guide you in your noticings.

5)       When finished with Argument terms, respond to the following questions in your WNB:

  • Who is the intended audience? Who is the targeted audience?
  • What makes the argument credible or not credible?
  • Does the writer give plausible reasons and evidence for her claims?
  • Does the writer fairly represent the opinions of people who disagree with him?
  • Does the writer adequately reflect the consequences to the audience, the “civic” aspect of the issue?
  • Does the writer propose some kind of action?

Work Collected: none       

Homework: Commit to a topic for your Civic Position Statement over the weekend. 

  • Come to class Monday with your CLAIM written in your WNB
  • Do some preliminary research on your topic and make notes in your WNB
    • On the BCHS library web site, explore the Research Databases
    • Perform a Google search

Week 13 (Nov. 12-16) Make-up Work

Monday 11/12

Today students were introduced to the second genre study of the semester: the Civic Position Statement.  Students watch a video of a college commencement speech to serve both as an example and as inspiration for finding their own big idea to write about.

Learning Objective: Use brainstorming strategies to identify an issue of significance for both the writer and an identified community.

Open your writer’s notebook and make a list of things you would like to change about the communities you live in:

  • Lakewood/Littleton
  • The United States of America
  • The planet Earth

1)       To introduce the idea of activism in history, watch Bono’s Commencement Speech to the University of Pennsylvania in 2004, “Because We Can, We Must” in which he discusses what BIG IDEA drives people to make change. Bono says that Africa was his BIG IDEA and that “it’s not a cause, it’s an emergency.”

  • Click on this link to watch the speech:

Bono’s Commencement speech to the University of Pennsylvania

 

2)       Download a written transcript of Bono’s Commencement Speech to the University of Pennsylvania

  • The handout is an excerpt of the speech. There are two passages in text boxes and some key bold-faced parts to help focus the discussion.

3)       Read this excerpt and write in your WNB about what Bono’s big idea is and what inspired Bono to tackle this issue.

4)       Now think about your own BIG IDEA. This about what Bono said:

“What’s the big idea? What’s your big idea? What are you willing to spend your moral capital, your intellectual capital, your cash, your sweat equity in pursuing outside of the walls of [Bear Creek High School]?”

5)       Respond to the following in your WNB:

  • Brainstorm a list of local, regional, state, national, and world-wide issues you might write use as your Big Idea.
  • Choose one.
    • Ø What is your big idea?
    • Ø When did it become important to you and how?
    • Ø Why is it important to you?
    • Ø What community would benefit from implementing your Big Idea?
    • Ø Why should it be important to others?

Work Collected: none

Homework: Read for at least 20 minutes and create 5 reading response for the week.  This is the last week of independent reading.  All reading responses due after Thanksgiving break.

 

Tuesday 11/113

Today students received the Civic Position Statement Prompt Sheet and watched a video to help them understand what is meant by the term Civic Position.

Learning Objective: Analyze the complexity of an issue by examining the facts, implications, and inferred consequences argued by those who hold differing viewpoints about the subject.

1)       Download a copy of the Civic Position Statement Prompt Sheet, or download one from your teacher.

  • Read it over carefully.

2)       Think about what makes the civic position essay different from the thought journey essay:

  • Thought Journey was about you, the writer, and your thinking about a topic; it was about bringing people around to seeing your point of view on a topic, not necessarily ‘convincing’ them of anything.
  • Civic Position is about your community, society, country, the world, and the rules that we use to live together.

3)       Think about the “civic” aspect of civic position.  Societies have rules that allow people to live together.  Without rules, people would not have the freedom to live the way they want and do what they want to do.  These rules should make living together in a community easier and fairer.  Ignorant people think rules are just Big Government curtailing people’s freedoms, but think about the rules of the road for example.  It is thanks to the basic rules of the road, stop lights, which side of the road we drive on, etc., that allow us to safely exercise the freedom to go where we want to go in the world.  Say there were no rules, and people drove on whatever side of the road they wanted, some people decided they would stop at a green light and go on read, etc.  Driving would be so unsafe that travel would be impossible.  The rules actually allow us to travel freely.  It is only because we have common rules, which we all agree to, that we can function together as a society.

This essay is about a policy, rule, or law that you feel should be changed or created.  It is not just about homework, or what should be served in the cafeteria.  The “civic” part is key to this essay: your topic has to be related to the rules that govern the larger community you live in, be it your city, county, state, country, or the world as a whole.  Bono’s big idea focused on changing the world; what will your big idea focus on?

4)       Watch a few videos from the web site Civic Action Project to show students examples of  CIVIC issues as presented by high school students.  Scroll down to the 2011 Multi-media contest for multiple student-created videos on a variety of “local” issues.

5)       Engage in another Brainstorming session in your WNB:

  • To which “communities” do you belong?
  • What topics/issues are important to you?
  • What topics/issues are important to your various communities?
  • What is a BIG IDEA that you would be willing to “spend your moral capital, your intellectual capital, your cash, your sweat equity in pursuing outside the walls of [Bear Creek High School?” as Bono asks.

Work Collected: none

Homework: Read for at least 20 minutes and create 5 reading response for the week.  This is the last week of independent reading.  All reading responses due after Thanksgiving break.

 

Blockday 11/14-15

Today students were introduced to key terms necessary to understand the components of a Civic Position Statement, and then students applied those terms to engage in a noticing session with our first Civic Position Statement mentor texts.

Learning Objective: Arguing an issue requires more than holding and defending a personal opinion; to plan and draft artful arguments, writers warrant claims, acknowledge opposing viewpoints, and assemble enough viable evidence to woo and win the audience.

1)       Connection to A Thousand Splendid Suns part 1

  • Read p277-278 about new laws of the Taliban.
  • In your WNB, choose one or a couple of related laws and write about how you would argue against it in a way that would convince people in general, if not the Taliban specifically.

2)       Download the Civic Position Statement: Important Terms handout on argument, or get one you’re your teacher.

  • Read over the handout carefully as an introduction to these terms:

claim, counterclaim, credibility, evidence, warrant, appeals (logos, pathos, ethos)

3)       Connection to A Thousand Splendid Suns part 2: Malalai Joya interrupting Parliamentary proceedings in Afghanistan.

  • Read the introduction below and then watch the on-line video clip.
  • Malalai Joya (Pashto ملالۍ جویا) (born April 25, 1978) is an activist, writer and a former politician from Afghanistan. She served as a Parliamentarian in the National Assembly of Afghanistan from 2005 until early 2007, after being dismissed for publicly denouncing the presence of what she considered to be warlords and war criminals in the Afghan parliament. She is an outspoken critic of the Karzai administration and its western supporters, particularly the United States.
  • Click on this link to watch the video: Malalai Joya before Afgan Parliament
    • Ø Ask to students to reflect, based on their reading of 1000 Suns, about how brave an act this was.

4)       Read the civic position statement “A Woman Among Warlords” by Malalai Joya

  • Use the Civic Position Statement: Important Terms handout to engage in a guided noticing session using the guided questions below.
  • Students make notes in their WNB.

Categories of Noticings

  • Claim & Counter Claim
    • Ø Where in the piece is the claim?
    • Ø How is it warranted?
    • Ø Is there a counter claim in the piece?
    • Ø How is it presented?
    • Ø How is the counterclaim dealt with?
    • Appeals
      • Ø Which appeals does the writer utilize?
      • Ø What form do they take?
    • Credibility
      • Ø How does the writer establish credibility? By reputation or authority? With evidence?
      • Ø How credible are the sources used to the INTENDED AUDIENCE?
    • Evidence
      • Ø What sorts of evidence are used to support the claim?
      • Ø Where does the counterclaim come from?
      • Ø Is there evidence used to refute the counter claim?
    • Argument
      • Ø How is the argument organized?
      • Ø Does the writer fairly represent the opinions of people who disagree with him?

5)       Read aloud, “The United States Must Stay in Afghanistan” by Sam Sedaei

  • Use the Civic Position Statement: Important Terms handout to engage in a guided noticing session using the guided questions above.
  • Students make notes in their WNB.

6)       Freewrite in your WNB: What issue would you be willing to stand up for, in front of your peers, your government, the world, the way Malalai Joya did, at risk to your very life?

  • Brainstorm topics for your Civic Position Statement. Students need to return after Thanksgiving Break with a topic in mind and some initial brainstorming completed.

Work Collected: none

Homework: Read for at least 20 minutes and create 5 reading response for the week.  This is the last week of independent reading.  All reading responses due after Thanksgiving break.

 

 

Friday   11/16

Today student took 1000 Suns Quiz #5 based upon the end of the novel, and then took the A Thousand Splendid Suns Reading Test to prove how their reading has improved over the course of the semester.

Learning Objective: Demonstrate your ability to understand what you read, analyze and interpret literature, and determine the meaning of unfamiliar words in context.

1)       Come to ACCESS and make up 1000 Suns Quiz #5

2)       Make arrangements with your teacher to take the A Thousand Splendid Suns Reading Test.

3)       This was the last week of reading responses.  Complete reading responses due after Thanksgiving.  Check the parent portal to see the total number of reading responses for your class and how many you need to complete over the break to get full credit for this 12 week assignment.

Work Collected: Quiz #5 and Reading Test

Homework: All reading responses due after Thanksgiving break.

 

Week 12 (November 5 – 9) Make-up Work

click Week 12 Nov 5-9 Make Up to download the entire file

Monday 11/5

Today students used the “Thought Journey” writing rubric to grade both the touchstone text they have selected from among the mentor texts, and their own essays.

Learning Objective: Giving, accepting, and responding to feedback are crucial responsibilities in a writing community; meaningful feedback leads to meaningful revision.

1)       Find the Thought Journey mentor texts on the class web site, or visit your teacher in ACCESS and find the mentor texts in the class binder.

2)       Look over all the Thought Journey essays we have read this semester, and select the ONE that is most like the one you are trying to write.

3)       Get out your Thought Journey writing rubric, or find it on the class web site, and print it off.

4)       Read the essay you have selected as your touchstone text from beginning to end.

5)       Re-read the essay, and use the rubric to “grade” the touchstone text you have selected.

  • Use a “warm” colored pencil (red, orange, yellow, pink, etc)
  • Read the bullets in the Mastery column one section at a time.
    • Ø Re-read the essay and circle the bullets that you think the essay hits
    • Ø If the mastery bullet does not apply, then move to Proficient, Partially Proficient, etc, until you find the bullet that the essay hits for each row of bullets.
  • Repeat with every section on the rubric.

6)       When you are finished, students use the rubric to evaluate your own revised draft of your Thought Journey essay.

  • Use a “cool” colored pencil (blue, green, purple, etc) to circle bullets one section at a time.
  •  As you move through each section, annotate your revised drafts using the bullets to make notes about where you fall short of proficient and places you could improve for mastery.
    • Ø Use this color code for your annotations:
      • Use “cool” color for Ideas & Organization annotations.
      • Use a pencil for Craft & Style
      • Use “warm” colors for Conventions
  • Annotations should reflect the language of the rubric and identify specific plans for how you will improve their own writing.

7)       The entire essay should be annotated for all three sections of the rubric for Tuesday.

  • Show your teacher that you have this done in class on Tuesday, or ASAP.

Work Collected: none

Homework: Read through chapter44 of 1000 Suns for Friday.  Continue to create 5 reading responses per week.

 


Tuesday 11/6

Today students made their final revisions, additions, and changes to their Thought Journey essays to get them into final draft form.

Learning Objective:

1)       Apply planning, feedback, and revision processes to calibrate writing purpose, adjust multi-modal patterns, and maximize audience appeal

2)       Develop and adjust details of evidence so that the audience’s understanding of the subject is both acknowledged and extended.

1)       Use the annotations you made on Monday to make further qualitative improvements to your essay.

2)       Use the Introduction to Syntax handout (see handouts tab or class notebook) to improve the sentence fluency and punctuation in your essay.

3)       Apply these guidelines for revision:

  • Revision involves qualitative improvements that develop and refine the essay according to purpose and the audience. This…
    • Ø May involve a complete rewrite.
    • Ø May involve new paragraphs, rearranging paragraphs, dividing and rewriting paragraphs.
    • Ø May include adding more detail to make writing more vivid and engaging.
    • Ø May include combining and rewriting sentences.
  • When you REVISE your essay, you EXPAND your essay:

Entertain a new perspective related to your purpose

EXplain details in more depth

Provide additional examples for points you make

Add a story, an example, or more facts

Notice a contradiction someone might raise to your ideas and purpose and revise

Develop your voice or add another voice to support your own: quotes, paraphrases, summaries from outside sources (research)

3) Save to Google Docs for Blockday.

Work Collected: Teacher checked student rubric and revised draft for evidence of Monday’s learning experience (see above)

Homework:

  • Have final polished ready-to-publish essay saved to Google Docs for Blockday.
  • Read through chapter44 of 1000 Suns for Friday.  Continue to create 5 reading responses per week.

 

Blockday 11/7-8                 Publishing Day

Today students went through a lengthy process of formatting a final draft for publication, printed and annotated their final drafts, submitted their essays on TurnItIn.com, filled out the Genre Study Process Rubric, and finally, we did a funky dance to celebrate being done with the journey of the Thought Journey essay that has taken the whole semester.

Learning Objective: Produce a polished, correctly formatted final draft of a purposefully crafted, extended piece of writing.

Part 1: editing and submission

1)       Download your essay from Google Docs to Microsoft Word.

  • Open your essay in Google Docs
  • Click on “File,” the first tab along the top menu
  • From the drop-down menu, click on “Download as” and select “Word”

Your essay should open up in Microsoft Word.

2)       Lead student through MLA formatting.  Use Writers Inc page 301(p277 for some editions) to format your essay according to MLA guidelines, including:

  • Right Justified Header: Last Name with Page#
  • Left Justified Heading: Name, Teacher, Class, Period, Date
  • Centered Title (not underlined, bold, or italics)
  • Double space
  • 1 inch Margins

If you don’t know how to do some of these things in Microsoft Word, see your teacher in ACCESS as soon as possible.

3) With a friend or family member, read your essay out loud to catch typos, sentence problems, etc.

4) Students make final corrections, SAVE on the school server, and print.

 

5) Submit essay to TurnItIn.com:  Instructions for Submitting an essay can be found by clicking on your teacher’s tab on the English 11 web site.

  • Go to TurnItIn.com
  • Log In
  • Click on your class period.
  • Find the assignment “Thought Journey essay,” and click “Submit.”
  • Click “browse,” then find your essay under “My Documents.” Click “open,” then click “upload.”
  • You will be taken to a new page. Click on “Submit,” and your paper should be turned in!

 

Part 2: Genre Study Process Rubric

1)       Go to the class web site and find the Genre Study Process Rubric in the Thought Journeys section of the Handouts page, and print a copy, or get one from your teacher.

2)       Read the first bullet in the Proficient column—if that bullet applies to your performance during the genre study, circle it; if not, move either left or right until you find the bullet that represents what you actually did.

  • Repeat with all bullets; Every Row should have ONE bullet circled.
  • When you finish a section, every bullet represents a score on the 5-point proficiency scale.
    • Ø Average all the bullets for the section, and write the average score on the _____/5 for that section.

 

Part 3: Writer’s Statement

On printed final draft of essay, students complete the following tasks:

1) At the top of 1st page, clearly state your primary purpose and target audience

2) Identify a section at least two paragraphs long where you intentionally blended modes to develop your idea and accomplish your purpose:

  • Use colored pencils to color code the section for modes.  Create a Mode Key in the left margin (red=narrative, blue=expository, etc)
  • On the back of the page with the color coding: (paragraph each)
  1. explain why you chose these modes
  2. explain how they were blended or transitioned from one to the next
  3. explain what you hoped to accomplish
  4. explain where you successful, and why

3) Use a color you did NOT use to color code and use it to underline and label where you articulate the Question/Problem/Claim of the essay.

  • In the margin explain why you chose to place it where you did.

4) Use the same color to underline and label where you articulate the Realization/New Understanding of the essay.

  • In the margin explain why you chose to place it where you did.

 

Part 4: Hard Copy Submission

1)       Organize your essay in this order:

(TOP)                     Thought Journey Rubric—write your name and period at the top.

Peer Reviewed Draft of essay

Annotated Revised Draft of essay

Annotated Final Draft

(BOTTOM)           Genre Study Process Rubric (completed)

2)       Paper clip and turn into IN-Box.

Work Collected: see Hard Copy Submission above

Homework: Read through chapter44 of 1000 Suns for Friday.  Continue to create 5 reading responses per week.

 

 

 

Friday 11/9

Today students took 1000 Suns Quiz #4 and engaged in a discussion activity about the book     

Learning Objective: Collaboration expands thinking.

1)       Come to ACCESS to take 1000 Suns Quiz #4.

2)       See your teacher about how to make up the discussion activity we did today.

Work Collected: 1000 Suns Quiz #4

Homework: Read through the end of 1000 Suns for Friday 11/18.  Continue to create 5 reading responses per week.

Week 11 (Oct. 29 – Nov. 2) Make-up Work

click here to download the entire file

Monday 10/29

Today students engage in a Peer Review Session with their genre groups, reading and responding to each other’s writing.

Learning Objective: Giving, accepting, and responding to feedback are crucial responsibilities in a writing community; meaningful feedback leads meaningful revision.

1)       You should have a printed hard copy of your typed essay.  On the back of page 1 of your essay (or on a separate piece of paper), copy the following template, and fill it out as neatly and as detailed as you can:

QUESTION/PROBLEM/CLAIM:

 

TARGET AUDIENCE:

 

PURPOSE:

 

APPROACH to CRAFT: (be sure to address how you blended modes to evoke intended audience response and lead them through thought journey. Describe the evolution of your claim through the thought journey)

 

NEW UNDERSTANDING/REALIZATION:

 

Read over the Peer Review Procedure below:

1)       Each person in the group reads their Peer Review Template along with their essay out loud to the group.

2)       Pass your essay one person to the right.

  • With your colored pencil, write your name at the top of your peer’s essay.

3)       Re-read your peer’s Peer Review Template, then read the essay and provide feedback:

  • Consider the writer’s PURPOSE: identify places where purpose is accomplished and where it is lacking
    • Ø “Here is where it was the scariest to me because…”
    • Ø “Here is where it wasn’t scary at all because…”
  • Consider your INTEREST as a reader:  identify with an X the places in the paper where you lose interest and try to explain why:
    • Ø “X   I am confused about what this has to do with your topic because…”
    • Ø “X   I was expecting you to tell the rest of the story, but you never came back to it.”
  • CONVENTIONS: indicate possible mistakes but do not correct
    • Ø Circle spelling/punctuation errors
    • Ø [Bracket sentences] that don’t make sense, fragments, run-ons
  • At the end, write one POSTIVE and one IMPROVEMENT comment about anything you want to point out to the writer (think modes, syntax, opening, closing, or anything else you deem important)

4)       HOT SEAT: pass one writer’s essay around and each person gives verbal feedback

  • What stands out to your when you think about this essay?
  • What is great and what could be improved?

Repeat with one at a time with each person’s essay.

5)       Come ready to do this on Tuesday, and perhaps there will be other students who were absent Monday with whom you can do this OR make a plan with your teacher.

Work Collected: none

Homework:

  • Go to the class web site and click on your teacher’s tab.  Find the TurnItIn.com directions and follow them to register for the class and submit a practice assignment.
  • Read for at least 20 minutes and create a reader response.

 

Tuesday 10/30

Today students completed the Peer Review Session started on Monday.  Students then used their Always/Sometimes/Never charts to make additional revisions to their first draft.

Learning Objective: Giving, accepting, and responding to feedback are crucial responsibilities in a writing community; meaningful feedback leads meaningful revision.

1)       See Monday’s make up work above.

2)       When students are finished, they annotate their essays for revisions.

  • Get out Always/Sometimes/Never chart
  • Look over the Always column until you find something you have not purposefully addressed in your essay.  Make notes to yourself about improvements you can make regarding this “always” thing.
  • Repeat with a new “always” thing until you have made purposeful revisions for everything on your list.

Work Collected: none

Homework:

  • Go to the class web site and click on your teacher’s tab.  Find the TurnItIn.com directions and follow them to register for the class and submit a practice assignment.
  • Read for at least 20 minutes and create a reader response.

 

Blockday 10/31-11/1

Today students had the period to make purposeful revisions to their Thought Journey essays using the feedback they got from the Peer Review Session as well as their own ideas based upon the “Always” column of their ASN chart.

Learning Objectives:

1)       Apply planning, feedback, and revision processes to calibrate writing purpose, adjust multi-modal patterns, and maximize audience appeal

2)       Develop and adjust details of evidence so that the audience’s understanding of the subject is both acknowledged and extended.

1)       A word about Revision: “A revised draft is more than just a neater version of the 1st draft…”

  • Revision involves qualitative improvements that develop and refine the essay according to purpose and the audience. This…
    • Ø May involve a complete rewrite.
    • Ø May involve new paragraphs, rearranging paragraphs, dividing and rewriting paragraphs.
    • Ø May include adding more detail to make writing more vivid and engaging.
    • Ø May include combining and rewriting sentences.
  • When you REVISE your essay, you EXPAND your essay:

Entertain a new perspective related to your purpose

EXplain details in more depth

Provide additional examples for points you make

Add a story, an example, or more facts

Notice a contradiction someone might raise to your ideas and purpose and revise

Develop your voice or add another voice to support your own: quotes, paraphrases, summaries from outside sources (research)

2)       Students use the feedback they got on Monday/Tuesday and their ASN charts to make qualitative improvements to their essays.

3)       Students may also use time for additional research if needed.

4)       Students who have not completed the TurnItIn.com assignment must do so during this period.

5)       Students should print at the end of the period.  Students should have a hard copy of the 2nd draft in hand when they come to class Monday.

Work Collected: none

Homework:

  • If you have not finished the 2nd draft of your essay, be sure it is done and printed and in your hand when you come to class Monday.
  • Go to the class web site and click on your teacher’s tab.  Find the TurnItIn.com directions and follow them to register for the class and submit a practice assignment.
  • Read for at least 20 minutes and create a reader response.

 

 

Friday 11/2

Today students took 1000 Suns Quiz #3, and then engaged in a question activity regarding chapters 24-34 of A Thousand Splendid Suns.

Learning Objectives:

1)       Participate effectively in collaborative discussions about literary texts and listen as competently as you speak.

2)       Scholarly readers depend upon textual evidence and craft analysis to interpret, discuss, and appreciate themes and aesthetics within literary texts.

1)       Come to ACCESS and take the 1000 Suns Quiz #3.

2)       Download a copy of the Levels of Questions chart, or get one from your teacher.

  • Based on their reading, make a list of:
    • Important to know story facts about the reading for today (Level 1)
    • Ø Things I am wondering about…things I suspect but am not sure about (Level 2).
    • General topics prevalent in the story (Level 3).

3)       Use your list in each column to generate Level 1, Level 2, and Level 3 questions.

4)       On the other side of the paper, write out the answers to Level 1 questions in your own words in complete sentences, AND write the quote from the novel that proves your answer is correct, including page number.

5)       With level 2 questions, find the evidence that helps you make the inference.

6)       With level 3 questions, find passages that deal with the topic in the question and serves as an example of how the author is answering the question.

7)       Show this work to your teacher.

Work Collected: 1000 Suns Quiz #3, levels of questions chart

Homework:

  • If you have not finished the 2nd draft of your essay, be sure it is done and printed and in your hand when  you come to class Monday.
  • Go to the class web site and click on your teacher’s tab.  Find the TurnItIn.com directions and follow them to register for the class and submit a practice assignment.
  • Read for at least 20 minutes and create a reader response.

 

Week 10 (October 22 – 26) Make-up Work

Click here to download the entire make-up file

Monday 10/22
Today students worked on their Thought Journey essays, finishing planning and pre-writing and then moving on to typing.
Learning Objective: Apply planning processes to calibrate writing purpose, adjust multi-modal patterns, and maximize audience appeal.

Decide where you are in the writing process:

1)       Planning & pre-writing done and ready to type>>>have your teacher check your plan.

2)       Topic chosen and ready to plan>>>choose one of the following options:

  1. Free write until you hit a dead end, then choose a planning template to complete
  2. Choose a planning template to complete (download from this site or get one from your teacher), then freewrite until you have tons of raw material to draw from.
  3. Plan your essay your own way and show your teacher when you think you are done.

3)       “Topic?  For what?” >>>take a look at the last few weeks of make-up work and get with the program.

1)       You should be to the “ready to type” stage by Tuesday.  Be prepared to show your teacher your planning and pre-writing so you can move on to the typing.

 

IMPORTANT: Save your work on the Schooggle (the Jeffco Google site).

login: id#@jeffcoschools.us

password: eight-digit birthday

Work Collected: none

Homework:

  • Go to class web site and click on your Teacher’s tab along the top.  Scroll down until you find the TURN IT IN.com instructions.  Follow instructions to set up and account and register for your teacher’s English 11 class.
  • Read for at least 20 minutes and create a reading response.

 

Tuesday 10/23
Today students who were finished with the planning and pre-writing for their Thought Journey essays moved on to typing.
Learning Objective: Apply planning processes to calibrate writing purpose, adjust multi-modal patterns, and maximize audience appeal.

1)       Everyone should have planning and pre-writing done, and ready to type, by the end of this period.

 

IMPORTANT: Save your work on the Schooggle (the Jeffco Google site).

login: id#@jeffcoschools.us

password: eight-digit birthday

Work Collected: none

Homework:

  • Go to class web site and click on your Teacher’s tab along the top.  Scroll down until you find the TURN IT IN.com instructions.  Follow instructions to set up and account and register for your teacher’s English 11 class.
  • Read for at least 20 minutes and create a reading response.

 


Blockday 10/24-25
Today students had the entire period to write, revise, and write some more.  Students should have a printed hard copy of whatever they have done so far in hand when they come to class on Monday.

Learning Objective: Apply planning processes to calibrate writing purpose, adjust multi-modal patterns, and maximize audience appeal.

  • If you still have not finished the planning phase of your essay, get it done.
  • If you are passed the planning stage, read over what you have written so far, and then continue typing.

1)       Take a break at some point and look back through all the Thought Journey mentor texts we read and try to find a “touchstone text,” (a text that serves as the best possible model of the essay you are trying to write.)

  • When you come to a stopping point, take a break and grab a class notebook.
  • Look back through all the essays we have read this semester, and choose one that is MOST like the kind of essay you are trying to write.  Many of these essays can be found on the web site.
  • Read it again with this in mind.  What can you Borrow & Steal from this essay to make part of your own?

2)       A hard copy of the first draft is due for peer review Monday.  Formatting not necessary.

 

IMPORTANT: Save your work on the Schooggle (the Jeffco Google site).

login: id#@jeffcoschools.us

password: eight-digit birthday

 

Work Collected: Printed hard copy of first draft.
Homework:

  • If you have not finished your first draft of your essay, be sure it is done and printed and in your hand when you come to class Monday.
  • Go to class web site and click on your Teacher’s tab along the top.  Scroll down until you find the TURN IT IN.com instructions.  Follow instructions to set up and account and register for your teacher’s English 11 class.
  • Read for at least 20 minutes and create a reading response.

 

Friday   10/26

Today students took 1000 Suns Quiz #3, and practiced using evidence to support their ideas about the book.

Learning Objective: Practice in providing evidence from literary works to support an interpretation fosters the skill of reading any text closely and influences readers to think critically, logically, and coherently.

1)       Come to ACCESS and take 1000 Suns quiz #2.

2)       See your teacher about what you missed in class today.

Work Collected: 1000 Suns Quiz #3

Homework:

  • If you have not finished your first draft of your essay, be sure it is done and printed and in your hand when you come to class Monday.
  • Go to class web site and click on your Teacher’s tab along the top.  Scroll down until you find the TURN IT IN.com instructions.  Follow instructions to set up and account and register for your teacher’s English 11 class.
  • Read for at least 20 minutes and create a reading response.